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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 11:36 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 02, 2009 1:24 pm
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Location: Bexley, Kent
Normally 19.99 round here but found a store with it bin end offered for £7

Popped and poured. Really stinky farmyard nose
Dusty cherry palate with a hint of cassis and cedar on the finish

With 2007 being such an approachable vintage this still feels young and upon initial drinking I was worried it may be lacking fruit but it opened up well after some time in the glass
Should develop/keep well for some time


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 12:52 am 
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Location: Berkshire
You're a lucky hunter alright - great find.

I'd love a stinky St Estephe for 7 knickers just now. For me, that wine would be a wizard with very rare roast beef. Being satisfying and stinky, and good on the lack lustre 2007, shows how classy the personality and capable the terroire is at Le Boscq.

How many have you got ?

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 10:39 am 
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Location: Bexley, Kent
Had this with shepherds pie last night but agree that rare roast beef would be a great match

Including this opened bottle, I have 9.
I managed to pick up the last 8 bottles in store the other day and found one solitary bottle in another store last night.
It was the acquisition of this extra bottle that leant me towards giving it a go last night
I was initially concerned at thee el of stickiness as couldn't put my finger in whether it wasn't right but thankfully with a little time it settled down and blew off a bit


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 10:00 pm 
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Shezza wrote:
I was initially concerned at thee el of stickiness as couldn't put my finger in whether it wasn't right but thankfully with a little time it settled down and blew off a bit


Excellent bargain harvest.
Stinkyness - Brettanomyces and / or terroire - perhaps both ... I didn't think that brett was very prevalent in the 2007 clarets because the less ripe fruit characteristic generally demanded a restrained approach to oaking. I've forgotten whether the bretanomyces is likely to develop more in wines from new oak barrels, or those from 2nd pass 2nd year use. Dourthe own Boscq since 1996 (I think) They are very experienced, so you'd believe they would make sure that one of their flag ship properties, would not be spoilt at 6 years on from over brett development - there would be reports by now, surely.

I think you may have to keep an eye on it though - by enjoying the wine more often. affordable.

Did you acquire some Chat Belgrave in the end ?

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 10:29 pm 
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Location: Bexley, Kent
The Le Boscq is a different animal the following day
Much more fruit now, the Brett has completely gone
This would be best somewhere I between the two stages maybe after a couple of hours decanted

On the Belgrave, I've acquired 4x 2006 & 2x 2004 so far on my travels at £7
There are 3 stores that still have this priced at £24.99


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 10:39 pm 
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Location: Berkshire
Shez
The Brett master class says that my simplistic comments regarding the farmyard (horse) and dung on the chateau Le Boscq nose, was possibly bull-poopie, and that the most pleasant animal, that I enjoy as long as it is not too strong, that you first detected could all be down to the terroire at Le Boscq. New oak is much more responsible for this strain of yeast, that could be resident quite deep within the wood, but only from certain anonymous coopers ?

This is a jolly good article, and is courtesy of Jamie Goode's blog. Thank you JG.

http://www.wineanorak.com/brettanomyces_masterclass.htm

Le Boscq from what you say, is certainly a keeper. I was drinking a CB 1996 St Estephe today, still very fresh, a young dark cherry colour, and bright and clear as well. Loads of life and cherry fruit in this wine, Chateau Picard CB '96 from Majestic, quite a few years ago

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 11:39 pm 
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Location: Ibuprofen Bay Winery
My elder brother is an organic chemist. I got this (along with a trichloro-asshole article) for him.

Makes interesting bed-time reading...

Isovaleric acid is seen as the primary cause of the flavors added to wine caused by Brettanomyces yeasts.[3] Other compounds produced by Brettanomyces yeasts include 4-ethylphenol, 4-vinylphenol, and 4-ethylguaiacol.[4] An excess of isovaleric acid in wine is generally seen as a defect,[4] as it can smell sweaty, leathery, or like a barnyard, but in small amounts it can smell smokey, spicy, or medicinal.[3] These phenomena may be prevented killing any Brettanomyces yeasts, such as by sterile filtration, by the addition of relatively large quantities of sulfur dioxide and sometimes sorbic acid, by mixing in alcoholic spirit to give a fortified wine of sufficient strength to kill all yeast and bacteria, or by pasteurization.

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