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PostPosted: Fri Sep 11, 2015 8:14 pm 
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Location: Berkshire
This is the 2012 Vintage:
https://www.majestic.co.uk/Malbec-Luigi-Bosca-zid40135
The wine drunk well, the wine needs a bit more time to sing its full song, yet at this stage it does open with a jolly good twist of spice and some vanilla, and the fruit is full and a medium dry. The tannins are not that firm, and they need to be there to provide structure.
A bold and rustic and alive wine, very opaque at the mo, but should mature very well, decent acidity to cut the palate, and with plenty of interest.
Great QPR at £9.99, (was £14.99) friendly for Autumn evenings and for Christmas fireside supping. Good stuff.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2015 5:01 pm 
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Tasted this morning, before I read this post..

Didn't make an impression. sadly, OK but no more, but....

I was saddened to see they are using those ghastly rubber bungs which come with the nonsensical 'vacuum' pumps which do wines no favours at all. I think some wines on the tasting counter had also been there too long, particularly a disappointingly nasty Faustino I..

However the Riberiro de Duero from an almost full bottle was magnificent. And £20.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2015 2:41 am 
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Interesting to read you dint rate vacuum pumps Pontac.
I use a vacuvin at home all the time which I find works very well fir preserving a wine for a few days
Agreed it doesn't work at majestic because they are constantly being depressurised if ever actually vacuumed at all in the first place. I took gave drunk tired/over aired wine at majestic's tasting counter

Which Ribera did you try ?


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2015 10:04 pm 
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I find the rubber Vacuvins work on a flat red quite well, if you don't keep pulling the stopper out on a tasting table. For an older, or delicate wine though, I find that they 'appear' to pull some of the life out of a wine, particularly pinot noir, if used over a longer period, but that will be the time open, and volume of space left in the bottle; so for me, the jury is out on this one for a fine wine. I find them best for young deep and dark rhone wines, or heavier new world shiraz mixes

For the Bosca malbec, I have drunk this at one 'glugging' sitting with my son-in-law on two occasions, he quaffs the style :wink: and ends up drinking 2/3 rds I'm glad you said that Pontac, because the spice twist, vanilla and age of the vines did make this one a decent cut above the norm. Clearly though, on the tasting table over a period of a few days, I can imagine how this would deteriorate to a soupy dullness over time. . . . .

I had a Mary le Bow 2005 2 weeks ago, with both son-in-laws' for Sunday lunch, large glasses, truely wonderful for 1 hour, then the beauty and complexity expires, quickly indeed. Do not Vacuvin this M le B '05, or . . . I regret, it would be dead and buried the next day.

The fridge and the cork for half consumed, young PN. Diam synthetic corks seem to work best for this.

I'm drinking a pleasant 2010 Bourgogne at the mo, half of it in the fridge for 24 hours, and it is warming up. My experence with these generally, that they may retain more of their beauty when immediately re-corked and held at 7 or 8 degrees C or so.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2015 11:08 am 
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Hi Shezza - can't remember which one, only one at 19.99 on website is Tomás Postigo 2011, so probably that.

Each to their own, but I loathe those vacuvins. IMO they scalp the flavour and sometimes seem to me to leave a rubbery tinge.

Oxygen gets in wine from the moment the cork/closure is removed. Fact of life. Vacuvin can't remove that, and it can't remove all the free oygen in the bottle. It's no more effective than replacing the closure asap and placing bottle in fridge.

I don't often have wine left in the bottle, but when I do I replace closure and put in freezer, topping up with leftovers till full. And I use that when wine is called for in cooking. Cooked Jamie Olivers beef stew* last week using a bottle of defrosted mixed red wine. Lovely, so much so family demanded it again this week.

http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/beef ... -beef-stew


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2015 2:24 pm 
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Sounds a little like the slow cooked brisket I've made recently
Interesting that he doesn't brown the meat before adding the veg and liquid
Half a bottle of Red wine in a casserole/tomato sauce always enhances the flavour


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2015 7:33 pm 
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I think, browning might make it tougher. Browning gives colour, but the red wine -- I add a bottle -- stains the meat a lovely deep colour.

Jamie says
Quote:
In stew recipes, you’re often told to brown off the meat first. But I’ve done loads of tests and found the meat is just as delicious and tender without browning it first, so I’ve removed this stage from the recipe.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 20, 2015 11:08 pm 
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Location: Bexley, Kent
Interesting about the browning
I alway though it locked in the juices but if slow cooking in liquid low and slow it shouldn't make much difference. Might add more flavour to the pan tho having that caramelised meat lining the pan that you then deglace with the wine


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2015 9:37 am 
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Since we're talking small cubes of meat, I'd have thought that by the time the outside is caramalised the inside would be cooked through.

Idea of the Jamies stew is the meat just falls apart when ready.

Anyway, why not give it a try!


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